What is Disposable Vaping?

Disposable vaping. What is it?

The latest rising trend in the vaping industry is known as “disposable vaping.” Disposable vapes are small devices that are meant for single use. This means that once the battery dies, or the eJuice inside runs out, the device as a whole is disposed of. Hence the name disposable.

So, where did they come from and what’s the good and bad?

Good question.

Focusing on simplicity and low cost, disposable vapes entered the market many years ago, but only really started gaining traction in the second half of 2020. The idea of these tiny new devices was simple - what if you weren’t attached to one device?

Disposable vapes work like this. You open the sealed package, puff on the device until the battery dies or eJuice runs out. Dispose of the device. Simple right? Well, that depends.

Ranging anywhere from $10 - $15 per device, with a lifespan of 250 - 800 puffs, disposable vaping is an easy and quick way to get your nicotine fix, but with one small setback, and one huge downfall.

So, what’s the set back? 

Depending on how much you vape, disposable vaping can be affordable or wildly expensive. For example, if you’re vaping a couple times a day to curve cravings, disposable vaping will make your vaping experience clean and simple. However, if you’re like me and you vape frequently throughout the day, the cost of disposable vaping doesn’t make sense. It’s simple math, but let’s take a look at the cost breakdown comparing Allo Disposables to a standard 30mL bottle of Blast eJuice for someone who vapes regularly.

Allo Ultra Disposables: 

  • Price: $14
  • eJuice (mL): 3.8
  • Lifespan (Days): 1.5
  • Cost Per Month (30 Days): $280

Blast eJuice:

  • Price: $20
  • eJuice (mL): 30mL
  • Lifespan (Days): 6.50
  • Cost Per Month (30 Days): $92

As you can see, if vaping is a part of your everyday routine, you will blow through the small amount of eJuice and battery life found in disposable vapes. Financially, it doesn’t make sense for anyone other than a casual vaper to have a disposable unit as their everyday device.

Don’t get me wrong, disposables do have their place. I find them as a great companion for running errands or walking the dog where carrying a larger unit around can become annoying.

So, what’s the huge downfall I mentioned earlier?

Two words.

Environmental disaster. 

Disposable vapes contain chipsets and batteries just as any other vaping device. With their growing popularity it’s becoming alarming how many people do not return their old units when returning to purchase a new one. We encourage everyone to bring their old disposables back to us where we dispose of them correctly with the rest of our old batteries, but the reality is that 1/10 come back to us. I’m going to assume that the remaining 9/10 are being thrown into people’s everyday garbage bins and making their way to landfills.

This is a problem.

Please, please, please bring back your old units. We will take them free of charge.

So there you have it. Disposable vaping. It’s clean, simple, and affordable for light vapers, but increasingly expensive for medium to heavy users and an environmental nightmare all around.

Let us know what you think. Where do you stand on disposable vaping? 

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